Serious Games Analytics: Methodologies for Performance Measurement, Assessment, and Improvement (Advances in Game-Based Learning) 2015th Edition

by Christian Sebastian Loh (Editor), Yanyan Sheng (Editor), Dirk Ifenthaler (Editor)

This volume brings together research on how gameplay data in serious games may be turned into valuable analytics or actionable intelligence for performance measurement, assessment, and improvement. Chapter authors use empirical research methodologies, including existing, experimental, and emerging conceptual frameworks, from various fields, such as: computer science software engineering educational data mining statistics information visualization. Serious games is an emerging field where the games are created using sound learning theories and instructional design principles to maximize learning and training success. But how would stakeholders know what play-learners have done in the game environment, and if the actions performance brings about learning? Could they be playing the game for fun, really learning with evidence of performance improvement, or simply gaming the system, i.e., finding loopholes to fake that they are making progress? This volume endeavors to answer these questions.

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Serious Games And Blended Learning; Effects On Performance And Motivation In Medical Education

By Mary Dankbaar

More efficient, flexible training models are needed in medical education. Information technology offers the tools to design and develop effective and more efficient training. The aims of this thesis were: 1) Compare the effectiveness of blended versus classroom training for the acquisition of knowledge; 2) Investigate the effectiveness and critical design features of serious games for performance improvement and motivation. Methods: Five empirical studies were conducted to answer the research questions and a descriptive study on an evaluation framework to assess serious games was performed. Results: The results of the research studies indicated that: 1) For knowledge acquisition, blended learning is equally effective and attractive for learners as classroom learning; 2) A serious game with realistic, interactive cases improved complex cognitive skills for residents, with limited self-study time. Although the same game was motivating for inexperienced medical students and stimulated them to study longer, it did not improve their cognitive skills, compared with what they learned from an instructional emodule. This indicates an 'expertise reversal effect', where a rich learning environment is effective for experts, but may be contra-productive for novices (interaction of prior knowledge and complexity of format). Discussion: A blended design is equally effective and attractive as classroom training. Blended learning facilitates adaptation to the learners' knowledge level, flexibility in time and scalability of learning. Games may support skills learning, provided task complexity matches the learner's competency level. More design-based research is needed on the effects of task complexity and other design features on performance improvement, for both novices and experts.

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